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Contrasting Paths: Tax Issues and Governance Challenges in Kenya and Ethiopia

Tax Issues _ Kenya _ Ethiopia
The fake smiles in the eyes of dictators (courtesy of The Author)

By Tulu Baye

The recent events surrounding tax issues and governance in Kenya and Ethiopia highlight stark differences in the challenges faced by these neighboring countries.

In Kenya, a recent demonstration by the youth led to the government rescinding a proposed tax increase on small businesses and services, showcasing a degree of democratic pushback. Despite persistent corruption concerns, there are signs of a functioning democratic process where citizens can voice their concerns and influence decisions.

Conversely, Ethiopia is mired in a deepening crisis. The government’s aggressive door-to-door tax collections, continuous tax hikes, and escalating living costs since 2018 have exacerbated economic hardships for its people. Internal conflicts, such as the Tigray war and the ongoing strife in Amhara, have further paralyzed economic activities and led to widespread suffering.

Beyond economic issues, Ethiopia’s social fabric is unraveling due to forced evictions, ethnic tensions, and internal conflicts, resulting in the displacement of millions and severe humanitarian crises. Basic necessities like bread have become unaffordable for many, painting a grim picture of daily life for the majority of the population.

Both Kenya and Ethiopia face calls for accountability and justice from their citizens. While Kenya demonstrates a level of responsiveness to public pressure, Ethiopia grapples with deep-rooted conflicts and governance problems that threaten the nation’s stability and development. Urgent action is needed in both countries to address these challenges and pave the way for a more stable and prosperous future for their people.

Editor’s note : Views in the article do not necessarily reflect the views of borkena.com


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1 COMMENT

  1. a 21-year-old Kenyan woman, vanished in 2012 after entering a hotel with British soldiers, according to reports. Her body was later found in a septic tank a 21-year-old Kenyan woman, vanished in 2012 after entering a hotel with British soldiers, according to reports. Her body was later found in a septic tank

    One of the more contentious accusations against British soldiers involves the case of Agnes Wanjiru.
    Wanjiru, a 21-year-old Kenyan woman, vanished in 2012 after entering a hotel with British soldiers, according to reports.
    Her body was later found in a septic tank. Despite a Kenyan inquest ruling her death a murder and the reported identification of a suspect by fellow soldiers, the British soldier allegedly involved hasn’t faced charges. Allegations of rape and other crimes, including murder, by British soldiers deployed there date back to the 1950s.
    “This to us is an example of British boys behaving badly,” said Marion Mutugi, a commissioner for the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights.

    Britain pays Kenya about $400,000 a year to allow its soldiers to train in the East African country, mostly in the expansive wildlife conservancies in Laikipia and Samburu counties. “It’s not like these kids are looking for a free ticket to the UK. We’re just saying that they deserve to get parental care from their fathers that every child deserves,” Mutugi of the Human Rights Commission said, claiming that the British government had shown no interest in resolving the cases.
    “These children deserve British citizenship. They’re British kids. Their fathers were British!” Mutugi said
    In a document handed to the Nairobi court and seen by AFP, BATUK commander Colonel Andrew Wilde said: “The UK government, as a foreign sovereign state, does not consent to submit to the jurisdiction of this honourable court.”
    The hearings mark the culmination of long-winded legal proceedings to try British soldiers under Kenyan law following years of lobbying by civil society groups and after initial pushback from the British government.

    “It is not correct to say that the Ministry of Defence or the UK government covered up the investigations or the revelations of the perpetrator of the alleged murder,” he said.

    London and Nairobi have been at odds over the question of jurisdiction for British soldiers who break Kenyan law.
    kenyanscoke/news/98628-russia-publishes-5-kenyan-soldiers-fighting-ukraine

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