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Referral hospitals in Amhara Region deliberately closed, medical professionals evacuate their duty stations

Ethiopian News - hospitals-Amhara

By Staff Reporter 

ADDIS ABABA – (BORKENA) – Tibebe-Ghion Special Hospital, which is under the College of Medicine and Health Sciences of Bahir-Dar University, has stopped providing regular services, health professionals and workers of the  Special Hospital said.

Health professionals who wanted to remain anonymous told Voice of America (VoA), Amharic Service that the hospital in The capital of Amhara Region, was closed last Wednesday following the intensified fight between government security forces and Fano militants. The health professionals who were serving at the hospital were forced to leave fearing for their safety in the fight between the two forces, according to witnesses approached by VoA.

VoA reported quoting two officials of the university, who preferred to remain anonymous as saying that the workers of the hospital have partially been absent from work since last Sunday.

Meanwhile, sources said that members of the government security forces took out patients at gunpoint from Tibebe Ghion Special Hospital saying that “they are members of Fano”. Witnesses said the “government soldiers” probably shot the patients. Similarly many in-patients who were dragged out of their beds in big Hospitals located in Gonder, Finote-Selam and Weldia Towns of Amhara Region were reportedly killed by the soldiers.

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