S. Sudanese rebels accuse government force of renewed fighting

Sudan Tribune
Published on August 19,2015

(KAMPALA) – South Sudanese rebels have accused forces loyal to president Salva Kiir of renewing violence by carrying out major offensives in the oil-rich Upper Nile state two days after the partial signing of a peace deal to end the 20-month long conflict in the country.

Captain Paul Malieth Koang, a spokesman for rebels special division one in Upper Nile, has told Sudan Tribune over phone interviews earlier on Wednesday that pro-government forces attacked their position in Manyo county (Thor athoi) area on Wednesday at 4:30 am local time.

“This morning our forces were under heavy attacks by pro-government [troops] at dawn, but we have repulsed them and still our forces are still holding their full control of territory,” Koang said.

He claimed the opposition forces managed to repulse the attacks at 5:00 am, adding another attempt by the government forces at around 10:30 am on their territory were repulsed with heavy causalities claiming around 20 soldiers from government side were left dead.

He also said that 32 AK-47 rifles, 2 PKM, 1 RPG and numerous ammunitions were seized from the government forces.

Koang urged the Intergovernmental Authorities on Development (IGAD), which has been mediating the talks for 20 months, to condemn the government action in strongest term possible. He accused Juba government of not interested to bring peace in the country.

“The IGAD and international communities must be aware that the government of South Sudan is not in position to peace talks, they are hoping for militarily solution which may not be an option for hundred years to come,” he added.

This alleged attack comes barely two days after President Kiir declined to sign IGAD’s compromise peace proposal, which was inked by the armed opposition leader, Riek Machar and Pagan Amum, a representative of the country’s former political detainees.

Several world leaders have urged President Kiir, who asked for 15 more days to make consultations, to sign the agreement seeking to end the 20-month old conflict, which has killed tens of thousands of people in the nation and displaced nearly two million of them.

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