Canada sanctions two South Sudanese military officers

Sudan Tribune
November 1, 2014

SPLA Maj. Gen. Marial Chanuong Yol (R), along with rebel commander Peter Gadet, were hit with US sanctions in May for their role in the South Sudan conflict (Photo: Reuturs/Goran Tomasevic)
SPLA Maj. Gen. Marial Chanuong Yol (R), along with rebel commander Peter Gadet, were hit with US sanctions in May for their role in the South Sudan conflict (Photo: Reuturs/Goran Tomasevic)

JUBA – Canada has imposed targeted sanctions against two military officers from both sides of the South Sudanese conflict for allegedly engaging in activities that directly or indirectly facilitated, supported, provided funding for or contributed to a violation or attempted violation of the cessation of hostilities deal South Sudan government reached with the SPLM-In-Opposition forces on January 23

The Canadian foreign affairs minister, John Baird named rebel commander Peter Gadet and the commander of South Sudanese government’s presidential guards, Marial Chanuong as those sanctioned.

“The targeting of civilians based on ethnicity is deeply concerning, and the individuals who perpetrate such atrocities should be held to account,” Baird said in a statement.

“These actions, including the attacks by rebel groups in Unity state over the past 48 hours, are in violation of the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement signed on January 23, 2014,” it adds.

The United States and European Union have also imposed sanctions on both leaders.

Tens of thousands of people have been killed and over 1.5 million displaced since the outbreak of conflict in the country as aid agencies warned of looming famine early next year.

“That is why Canada is announcing targeted sanctions against individuals who have been directly or indirectly facilitating and supporting the ongoing hostilities on both sides of the conflict,” stressed Baird.

“We are extremely disturbed by UN reports describing gross violations of human rights by both parties to the conflict on a massive scale, including possible war crimes and crimes against humanity,” he added.

Up to 100,000 people are currently live within UN protection of civilian sites with nearly half of them in South Sudan’s Unity state alone, the world body says.

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